Our bumpy road to Angola


We had troubles ahead of the start of the IKEA IWitness trip to Angola. Our fifth team member, Steffi, unfortunately could not join us anymore. And we had to wait for our visas until the very last moment.

Team Austria at Vienna airport - photo Gerald Folly

Team Austria at Vienna airport – photo Gerald Folly

Finally everything went fine. We – Lisa, Max, Pedro and Gerald from IKEA Austria – met Anna from UNICEF Austria on Sunday evening at Vienna Airport. For Pedro this is an especially exciting journey, as he will return to his home country after 14 years.

Stop over at Dubai airport - photo Lisa Spitzhuetl

Stop over at Dubai airport – photo Lisa Spitzhuetl

On the way to Angola we had two flights: first to Dubai and then further to Luanda, Angola’s capital city. In Dubai we met Juli from the IKEA Foundation and continued our travels together.

Arriving at the airport in Luanda, we were picked up by Gwen and our driver from UNICEF Angola. It was quite warm but not so hot as we expected. In addition, we all recognised the dust in the city. Actually we travelled about 24 hours by the time we reached our hotel in Luanda. So everybody was very happy to take a shower.

In Lunada, woman selling bananas on the street - photo Gerald Folly

In Lunada, woman selling bananas on the street – photo Gerald Folly

For Pedro it was a very special evening: After more than ten years he could meet his family members in Luanda. He was very happy to see his cousins again and they spent the evening together catching up about the past.

Group photo with Pedro and his family a happy reunion after 14 years. Photo - Gerald Folly

Group photo with Pedro and his family, a happy reunion after 14 years. Photo – Gerald Folly

Finally we had a nice dinner at the port of Ilha with a large overview towards the skyline of the city. Driving though the city – from the airport to the hotel to the restaurant – we felt the big gap of wealth between rich and poor.

The IWitness team, Lisa, Anna, Juli, Gerald, Max and Pedro - photo Gerald Folly

The IWitness team: Gwen (UNICEF Angola), Anna (UNICEF Austria), Gerald (IKEA Austria online shop), Juli (IKEA Foundation), Pedro (IKEA Klagenfurth) Lisa (IKEA Voesendorf), Max (IKEA na) – photo Gerald Folly

At the end of the day we typed this first blog entry around the table in the lobby of our hotel. We are curious to know what tomorrow will bring us. Good night :-)

About Maximilian Lauterbach

I’m 33 years old, and I have worked in the Logistics Department of the Vienna North store for almost 10 years. I like travelling, especially meeting local people and learning from other cultures. Also, I’m very interested in history and politics. It’s a big pleasure for me to be a part of the IWitness programme, and I’m very excited to travel to Angola.

Why we need to improve education in Angola


Our next group of IWitness Global Citizens is off to Angola to visit UNICEF projects funded by our Soft Toys for Education campaign. Today we have a wonderful post by Désiré Adomou, Education Specialist at UNICEF Angola, about why education is so important.

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My name is Désiré Adomou, and I joined UNICEF Angola four months ago as an education specialist. My current areas of focus include early childhood education and teacher training.

As a youngster, I witnessed first-hand the difference that quality education can make in someone’s life, drawing from the experiences of my own relatives. Early on, I understood that education not only transforms lives but also gives those who are “blessed” with schooling a certain leverage that people who lack academic training do not necessarily possess. As result of this awareness, I decided not only to pursue quality education for myself but also to help others do the same.

Consequently, over my 23 years of professional experience in the field of education, I always feel a sense of personal gratification whenever my students or trainees achieve a major academic milestone. Unfortunately, achieving such academic milestones remains a luxury for scores of Angolan children because of the poor quality of education, one of the results of close to three decades of civil war.

I feel gratified at being part of UNICEF -Angola because of its relentless efforts to help the Angolan ministries in charge of education and social welfare in their endeavours to foster quality education that is accessible to ALL children. We’re working hard to provide Angolan children with that priceless chance that children in other parts of the world take for granted.

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Understandably, UNICEF’s ability to improve the quality of education in Angola is only possible because of the generosity of partners like the IKEA Foundation, and I cannot help expressing my sincere gratitude for all the IKEA Foundation does to help promote a better world filled with educated minds.

 

About Juli Riegler

Juli is the IKEA Foundation's Digital Communications Manager. Next to managing the IKEA Foundation's website and Facebook account she works closely with Save the Children and UNICEF and IKEA's yearly Soft Toys for Education campaign. She enjoys doing a lot of different sports, travelling and connecting with people from around the world.

School Spirit and a Safe Haven


So its day three of our IWitness trip in South Africa and waking up it was a completely different climate, much warmer than the previous morning. Today we travelled to the province of Mpumalangaand visited two different schools not too far from one another, Langa High School and Hokwe Primary School. The drive up was spectacular with views out across large valleys dotted with households. After a good 30 minute drive we arrived at Langa where the welcome was extraordinary, with traditional dancing and drums beating as majorettes lead us into the compound. Here we met the principal (since 2012), school governing bodies and SMT (School Management Team). Not to forget Ceffie the Rhino who is the mascot for the Child Friendly Schools initiative.

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Tuck shop ladies joining in on the festivities outside Langa High School – by Mike Creevy

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School Majorettes dance alongside the school principle at Langa High School – by Mike Creevy

After the welcome the students went back to class as it was important that we did not disrupt the learning for the day. We were fortunate to have the opportunity to split into small groups to observe classes. A group of us joined grade 11 in their accounting class where a small number of students only 15 of them, discussed the costs of running a manufacturing company. Others sat in on a Biology class. This experience was much more informative than any presentation or statistical grade review done by the management. We were able to observe the quality of education the children receive through the interaction and participation in class. UNICEF works with the government to provide schools with workbooks which help improve literacy, numeracy, science and domestic skills. These books are mostly in English providing an extra challenge for the students however it was easy to see that the level of learning is of a very high standard. The learners amazed us by being so well behaved and eager to help each other out as each student was encouraged to contribute to the lesson.

A learner shows another how to work out the manufacturing costs in their accounting lesson - by Mike Creevy

A learner shows another how to work out the manufacturing costs in their accounting lesson – by Mike Creevy

This behaviour didn’t seem like it was just for us as they had so much respect for their teachers and principal. It was just lovely to see how relaxed the relationship is between the pupils and educators. After speaking with a few of the children it was clear how important school was to each and every individual. Not only did it give them an education and a place to socialise but it gave the children a place to feel safe, a meal for the day, healthcare but most of all school gives them choices and options with their life, it gives them a future. We could see how much the children appreciates those things in their determination to get to school each day and work hard to reach their ambitions.

Paul Fishwick shares his photographs and stories from the UK with some very intrigued students - by Mike Creevy

Paul Fishwick shares his photographs and stories from the UK with some very intrigued students – by Mike Creevy

Students queue for their lunch provided by the school - by Mike Creevy

Students queue for their lunch provided by the school – by Mike Creevy

Langa High School has vastly improved their children’s educational requirements as well as participate in the Child Friendly School scheme initiated by UNICEF, allowing them to develop their fullest potential in a safe space. With many children aspiring to be engineers, doctors and scientists.

The second part of the day was at Hokwe primary school with a total of 284 students including 55 grade R students (reception age 5-6). This school has been open since 1983 and faced many challenges since, such as a storm in 2002 that destroyed and washed away part of the school. We began by visiting the grade R class (Reception), full of little ones from the age of 5. Almost 50 children were quietly seated on a floor mat in the corner of the room as the two teachers discussed their learning programme. To show off the childrens skills a few little ones were asked to draw for us. They took out a sheet of paper and one child began to draw different shapes while another drew for us the cutest version of a happy child.

A child from Grade R shows Ben from UNICEF SA his drawing skills - by Mike Creevy

A child from Grade R shows Ben from UNICEF SA his drawing skills – by Mike Creevy

A child from grade R draws a happy child for us - by Mike Creevy

A child from grade R draws a happy child for us – by Mike Creevy

Afterwards we moved into the teachers lounge to be shown a play by the grade R’s. They reenacted the process of going to the doctors with a health problem, being diagnosed and getting medication. It was a wonderful performance that taught the children the importance of visiting the doctor when they feel unwell.

We were led outside and the students continue with traditional dancing (of which Paul Fishwick and Johanna Heuren joined in!). The atmosphere was fantastic with the most satisfying part being the smiles on the children’s faces.

Children from Hokwe primary school perform traditional dance for us - by Mike Creevy

Children from Hokwe primary school perform traditional dance for us – by Mike Creevy

The headmaster discussed some opportunities he believed would improve the everyday lives of the children. One of these was having play equipment for the young ones such as swings. They do have a big field where they play and where they can let their steam off, but swings also help children practice their balance and improve their coordinated movements.

When they rebuilt the school they also built several toilets which are WASH certified, meaning Water And Sanitation Hygiene approved. Another fantastic initiative is that the school grow their own vegetables (tomatoes, onions, cabbage etc.). That is sustainability at is best!

A prowd gardener at Hokwe Primary School waters her cabbages - by Mike Creevy

A prowd gardener at Hokwe Primary School waters her cabbages – by Mike Creevy

Thanks to UNICEF and the support of Ikea through the Soft Toy Campaign, children in South Africa have the chance to learn and thrive. The children we visited today were extremely happy and have the opportunity to have a brighter future through education. What made this school even more inspiring was the strong support the school had from the principle to the school governing body. It was again another inspiring day.

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About Paula Cade

Hej! I’m Paula, 32 years old and from England. I started working for IKEA in 2010 as a customer services co-worker in the contact centre and recently a Unit Project Leader for the More Sustainable Life at Home project. I am currently in a secondment position for Sustainability Specialist. I feel proud to work for a company that works with social and environmental issues to ensure we have a positive impact on people and the planet. It is clear that even the smallest steps combined can make a big difference. I am excited to share with you my experience in South Africa.

Educating the Future


 

After an overnight stay in Vrede, a town in the Free State province of South Africa, we head off to the province of Mpumanlanga. We are quite surprised by the cold 4-degree-Celsius temperature in the morning. The air is filled with fog and mist as we embark onto our vehicles, set out for an hour and a half long drive to Ermelo. The trip takes us through a sparsely populated countryside which resembles the English moors.

The beautiful landscape of Mpumalanga outside Vrede on this misty, chilly morning. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

The beautiful landscape of Mpumalanga outside Vrede on this misty, chilly morning. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

The drive towards Umfudlana school changes as we shift from driving on a tar road to a gravel road with plenty of dust to follow. Upon our arrival at the school, we are greeted by several school teachers, as well as officials from the Department of Education. This school is fairly new, having opened in 2009, and consists of six buildings that are set on a large field, with no neighbouring houses or buildings, a contrast to yesterday’s township schools.

Entrance to Umfudlana Combined School, Mpumalanga. Photographer: Mike Creevy.

Entrance to Umfudlana Combined School, Mpumalanga. Photographer: Mike Creevy.

Umfudlana is a combined school, which means that students range from 5-18 years, with many of the children coming from families working for the farmers around. Some farmers refuse to let anyone cross their fields, which means the children sometimes need to walk up to three kilometres around big fields to get to their bus stop. With road safety being poor, it can be a dangerous walk. In South Africa, school transport is provided if the learner lives more than 10 km away. At Umfudlana, several large school buses are parked up in the school yard; they are used for collecting the students who live up to 20 km away.

School buses lined up in the school yard at Umfudlana Combined School, Mpumalanga. Photographer: Mike Creevy

School buses lined up in the school yard at Umfudlana Combined School, Mpumalanga. Photographer: Mike Creevy

The school currently has 447 students with 15 teachers. As we digest this information, we start to calculate; this means a teacher to student ratio of 30 to 1, and anyone who has attended any school knows it is not easy keeping 30 children focused, especially if their ages range from 8 to 14. The teachers explain how they have adapted to working with these group sizes; the classes are shared, so a typical classroom may have several grades studying in them at the same time. This is known as multi-grade teaching. The lack of educated teachers contributes to this issue. The school also has a classroom with 23 computers; however, due to the lack of a computer science teacher, they have still not been able to install or use them.

In the schoolyard, listening to teachers and other educational professionals talking about their progress and challenges. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

In the schoolyard, listening to teachers and other educational professionals talking about their progress and challenges. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

South Africa has 400,000 teachers; however, most of them had their education during the Apartheid regime (before 1994), which means they received a low competence level and a very different approach to education from the younger teachers educated during the democracy. The newer-educated teachers tend to go into the private sector, the curriculum of which is considered one of the best in the world. UNICEF is currently working with the government on a huge project aiming to re-educate about 180,000 teachers to ensure an improved level of education. This has been made possible partly thanks to IKEA’s Soft Toys for Education campaign contributions.

In addition, the IKEA Foundation also contributed towards the implementation of the safe and caring child-friendly school initiative. The aim of project is to address barriers to teaching and learning. This project has been rolled out to 151 schools in Mpumalanga Province, and the intention is that once the project has been successfully tested in these schools the Mpumalanga Education Department will then roll it out to the remaining schools in the province. A safe and caring child-friendly school regards education as every child’s right and helps ensure the rights and wellbeing of every child in the community. A child-friendly school acts in the interests of the “whole” child, which includes his or her health, nutrition and overall wellbeing. It is also concerned with what happens to the child at home and within the community before he or she enters school and once his or her school career is completed.

During our visit to one of the multi-grade classrooms, we discover a class with more than 50 learners. When we walk in they are studying social sciences, which is similar to Personal, Social and Health Education in the UK, a very important part of the curriculum. The energy in the room is uplifting, and the students engage us in a talk about their dreams for the future—the class is full of aspiring soccer players, along with doctors and engineers! Talking with the students, we found they have big appetites for learning and chasing their dreams. An 11-year-old learner, Ngkwabi, who impresses us with her mathematical skills, tells us, “I want to become a teacher so I can inspire other children. I want to be like my teacher.” It is apparent that, no matter what corner of the world you are in, we all share commonalities, one being the magic of education that can give us a vision and a platform to be our best.

One of the multi-grade classes at Umfudlana Combined School. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

One of the multi-grade classes at Umfudlana Combined School. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

We then visit the early childhood Ddvelopment class, also referred to as the Grade R class (‘R’ for Reception). The young children, age 5 and 6, sit at their tables, colouring in. They are all working with Department of Basic Education workbooks.

Basic Education Workbooks. Photographer: Mike Creevy

Basic Education Workbooks. Photographer: Mike Creevy

The classroom is colourful and filled with the children’s creative activities, whether it’s learning the alphabet, the days of the week, counting or drawing. The teacher calls a little boy to the blackboard and asks him to write out numbers on the board. Bonginkosi, a 6-year-old learner, starts to write and illustrates how his numeric skills have been well developed thanks to the Early Childhood Development programme, which is another programme UNICEF helps the South African government support.

The Grade R classroom full of creativity at Umfudlana Combined School. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

The Grade R classroom full of creativity at Umfudlana Combined School. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

Bonginkosi, 6 years old, showing his skills at Umfudlana School, Mpumalanga. Photographer: Ben Smith

Bonginkosi, 6 years old, showing his skills at Umfudlana School, Mpumalanga. Photographer: Ben Smith

Then it’s time for the children to be physically active, and we all go outside in the nice weather. They start several nursery games, which are very similar to what we find at home. The IKEA team didn’t take long to jump in, playing tag. Even though we don’t speak their language, Zulu, play is play! We all had loads of fun and some healthy competition.

The Grade R children playing Tag at Umfudlana Combined School. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

The Grade R children playing Tag at Umfudlana Combined School. Photographer: Johanna Heuren

The teachers tell us that, although they are faced with several challenges, the aim of their school is to provide a safe place for learners, where students are encouraged to reach their potential and are provided with a daily nutritious meal, which is for some of them the only meal of the day. We say our goodbyes and thanks to the children and educators. They have given us lots of motivation to tell their stories and lift our energies in fundraising for our Soft Toys for Education campaign, which will soon again be in our stores.

 

 

About Michael Creevy

Hello there, my name is Mike; I am 24 and work as a PR co-ordinator in the UK service office. I have been with IKEA for almost 7 years (I can’t believe it’s been that long) and I have loved it. I feel proud to work for a company that does so much for their local communities as well as globally and I’m looking forward to seeing this firsthand. Being passionate about traveling I am fortunate to have been to some amazing places and had some great experiences but I know that my trip to South Africa with UNICEF will be something that will stay with me for a long time. I can’t wait to play my part in sharing this with you.

Wamukelekile!


 

“Wamukelekile”—Zulu for welcome—to our first blog…

After a very long journey direct into the southern Hemisphere, we spent our first few hours in South Africa looking forward to bedtime. Our journey from O.R. Tambo International airport near Johannesburg showed a very European looking city we would easily recognise, but the South Africa we will be visiting is a world away from our first impressions and a land of huge contrasts!

The IWitness team arriving at O.R. Tambo airport. Photograph taken by Laura Zabel

The IWitness team arriving at O.R. Tambo airport. Photograph taken by Laura Zabel

Some of the hard-to digest-facts are that South Africa has over 15% of the population living with HIV; every 30 seconds a female is raped; and alcohol, drug abuse and domestic violence are an everyday occurrence for lots of people.

Day one of the IWitness programme started with a talk by Nadi Albino, who is The Chief of Education for UNICEF in South Africa. Nadi explained the different programmes in place in SA, covering education, social policy, child protection, and health and nutrition.

Education in South Africa is compulsory from the ages of 7 to 15, with an equal mix of boys and girls going. Children are keen to be educated, and 99.6% attend primary school. A majority of the schools are tuition-free, and a big incentive for the children to attend is the hot meal served.

After a couple of hours’ drive east, we found our surroundings changing dramatically from developed compounds and shopping centres to wide-open spaces dotted with townships filled with small homes constructed from corrugated metal. We arrived in the town of our first school visit, Standerton. The settlement was very much the same as what we had seen on the road, just on a bigger scale.

: View from the car of the roadside townships, photograph taken by Johanna Heuren

View from the car of the roadside townships, photograph taken by Johanna Heuren

Driving into Janrell Secondary School, we were overwhelmed from being greeted by very excited pupils and teachers who had gone to great efforts to welcome us with open arms, with the pupils dancing and singing on our arrival. We were first taken to the school courtyard, where the children hung over the stairwells to get a better view of the celebration.

Our warm welcome to Janrell Secondary School, photograph taken by Johanna Heuren

Our warm welcome to Janrell Secondary School, photograph taken by Johanna Heuren

The principal called herself the Queen and considered the school and the students her castle, which she seemed to care for more than anything. We were amazed by her strong leadership and dreams of making this school the absolute most successful school in the country. After introductions and speeches, we got to see a performance from the school choir. The quality, energy and professionalism of the choir impressed us all, as we were treated to the voices of provincial champions who compete on a national level.

The ‘Queen’ Nhlapo, showing the schools plan for the future. Photograph taken by Johanna Heuren

The ‘Queen’ Nhlapo, showing the schools plan for the future. Photograph taken by Johanna Heuren

Here UNICEF have focused on sports programmes, including constructing sports facilities and collaborating with local sports authorities to ensure that the children get even more from the curriculum. So, after the celebrations and display of the school’s achievements, we were rushed off to a primary school nearby to join in on a physical education (P.E.) session before the school finished at 2pm.

Johanna joining in with the children’s P.E lesson, photograph taken by Paula Cade

Johanna joining in with the children’s P.E lesson, photograph taken by Paula Cade

We watched the children for a few seconds and then eagerly joined in, jumping traffic cones, jumping rope, balancing on a thin bar with a sand sack on our heads, and jumping hula hoop rings. The kids and us were having a great time, and we must admit we had a hard time keeping up with this very energised bunch. Their trainer, Miss Reneilwe, does this for free with great passion. Her dream is to work with administration at FIFA, but in the meanwhile, apart from having the afternoon at the primary school, she passionately coaches the football team.

School football teams pose with UNICEF and IKEA representatives, photograph taken by Lyle Jacobs

School football teams pose with UNICEF and IKEA representatives, photograph taken by Lyle Jacobs

 

About Johanna Heuren

Hej, I am a Store Manager and have been working in IKEA since 2007. I started in Sweden, where I’m from, and as I love experiencing new cultures and meeting new people I was happy to go to Italy for 3 years in 2009. Since 2012 I am in the UK. My passion is people and IKEA’s belief that you grow business through people fits right with mine. Seeing people develop and grow is amazing on any level and can make the world around us a little bit better. I feel very proud, fortunate and excited to be given the possibility to go and see how we as a company have contributed to a little bit better every day in South Africa.

Welcome back to South Africa


 

One year has passed since our IWitnesses from IKEA Norway visited our Soft Toys for Education-funded projects with UNICEF in South Africa. Now, one year later, a group of IKEA co-workers from the UK and Ireland will follow in their footsteps to see how the donations from the Soft Toys for Education campaign are making a difference in the lives of many children in South Africa.

Take a look at the lovely film IKEA Norway made last year, and get inspired to follow the new series of blog posts we will be publishing in the coming days.

 

 

About Juli Riegler

Juli is the IKEA Foundation's Digital Communications Manager. Next to managing the IKEA Foundation's website and Facebook account she works closely with Save the Children and UNICEF and IKEA's yearly Soft Toys for Education campaign. She enjoys doing a lot of different sports, travelling and connecting with people from around the world.

Malawi: the heart of Africa


The journey to Malawi has been great in so many aspects. I got to know a new country and culture—not to mention fantastic, friendly people—and it’s not for nothing that Malawi is called the Heart of Africa.

It’s been amazing to see how the money funded through the IKEA Foundation is being used in cooperation with UNICEF other NGOs and local communities. What perhaps strikes me the most is that many of the projects we have visited are very much dependent on people working on a voluntary basis. This is men and women, coming from very poor conditions themselves, still having the force to help others.

In a country where more than half of the population is under 18 years old, the abuse of young women is widely spread, teenage pregnancies are common and the inequality between men and women is a fact, the change needed is huge and will take generations.

Travelling with Michael, the UNICEF education specialist, and Kusali, a communication officer, seeing what we are able to do both long term in building systematic change and on an individual level here and now was breathtaking.

In one of the primary schools we visited, we got to meet a fantastic young women, an A student with the dream to become a doctor. She was 15 years old and had dropped out of school because her mother was an alcoholic, her father was dead and she was living with her grandmother. She got no formal support and her grandmother wanted her out, marrying her off much too young. The girl was prepared to have sex for the notebook she didn’t have. Kusali, our local UNICEF representative, asked to have a talk with her—a talk where she convinced the girl about her importance, all the things she was able to do if she stayed in school, stayed away from risky sex practices that could lead to HIV. From the bottom of my heart, I hope these young women will be able to realize their dreams. I know that Anke gave her IKEA notebooks, and probably she will get a scholarship. This is one life of many.

A non-child friendly school hosting 150 students sitting on the concrete flooring. This school is on the priority list to become child friendly - By Kristina Johansson

A non-child friendly school hosting 150 students sitting on the concrete flooring.
This school is on the priority list to become child friendly – By Kristina Johansson

To understand the change needed and to drive that change, children need to go to school. The change that is being done to transform many schools to child-friendly schools with a safe and stimulating environment for children is impressive, but still so much more needs to be done.

Malawi is very much dependent on donation money; 40% of the country’s income comes from donations from other countries and organisations. Malawi needs to foster entrepreneurs and leaders who are not afraid to build from nothing to grow a business. A generation that is not prepared to live on donations but wants to contribute to drive growth.

Even though the challenges in Malawi are many and the conditions in many villages and schools are poor, I leave Africa with a warm heart. I leave feeling good with the many fantastic and strong leaders I met, who are willing to drive change and willing to make a difference. I leave with the memory of so many happy children and their smiley faces, having seen for myself the impact we can have working together.

UNICEF in cooperation with local communities makes it possible for this children to spend a couple of hours in a safe environment - By Kristina Johansson

UNICEF in cooperation with local communities makes it possible for this children to spend a couple of hours in a safe environment – By Kristina Johansson

About Kristina Johansson

I am a Retail Country Manager and I have worked at IKEA for 14 years. I’m passionate about people and their development and love to see people grow. I’m proud of how IKEA takes social responsibility, and I feel committed to support this in my role as a leader. I’m looking forward to seeing some of the achievements our organisation has contributed to in Malawi.

Why a child-friendly school is important…


After seeing some very nice UNICEF projects, this morning we started by visiting a non-child-friendly school. It’s the last day of our official fieldtrip and I didn’t know what to expect.

The headmaster told us about the history of Nthulo Primary School in Thyolo. It was founded in 1928. At this moment there are 1,759 students who get educated at this school. They get taught by only 23 teachers. You do the math. Sometimes the school is so full that classes take place under the tree. Today only one class was taking place outside, in the building that in an ideal world should be used as a dining area.

I got called over by Michael Banda, the education specialist of UNICEF Malawi. “Please do something for me,” he asked. “Go and walk around that class. Try to listen to the sounds that the kids make every couple of minutes.” Of course I did what he’d asked me. As I walked around, it hit me after two minutes. The kids were coughing all the time. “This is one of the differences between a child-friendly and a non-child-friendly school,” Michael told me. What struck me the most was the fact that at the start of the tour I was thinking: “It’s nice to be able to sit outside and learn. What’s the big fuss about?”

Boy in front of class in outside classroom at the Nthulo Primary school - By Marlies Davids

Boy in front of class in outside classroom at the Nthulo Primary school – By Marlies Davids

Without words Michael had shown me the challenges that a non-child-friendly school has. Limited teachers, no benches to sit on so the kids sit on the ground, wind, no learning materials and especially lots and lots of dust. Before a child can start to learn, he or she has to overcome so many boundaries. And with all these challenges, the kids are so very happy, friendly and motivated.

Boy in front of class at the Nthulo Primary school. Not (yet) child friendly - By Marlies Davids

Boy in front of class at the Nthulo Primary school. Not (yet) child friendly – By Marlies Davids

After a break enjoying the lovely nature of Malawi, we visited Thyolo Youth Action Centre and a daycare centre. This centre runs a youth centre programme that provides youth and children space to participate in various programmes that affect them in having a hopeful future.

One of the most important programmes running in this centre is the Go Girls programme. It provides girls with awareness about HIV, their rights, their needs, relationships with family and friends, and their role in the community.

I was very proud and surprised to hear that the sports fields built next to the centre are completely financed with money collected by the Soft Toys for Education campaign. It’s amazing to see what we can achieve by running a very successful yearly good cause campaign.

About Marlies Davids

Hej! I am 31 years old and living in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. For six years, I have worked at IKEA Barendrecht, currently as a Local Marketing Specialist. I’m thankful for getting the opportunity to go on this IWitness trip and visit the projects that UNICEF supports with help from the IKEA Foundation. I hope to take the experience of this trip with me to the future and to use it in a good way.

Day of the shocking numbers


Malawi is one of the poorest countries in the world. It’s number 171 out of 187 of the Human Development Index. That sounds really bad, of course. But what does it mean? What does this number say? How hard is life in Malawi?

Today we had an introduction to what UNICEF is doing in Malawi. Roisin Du Rurca, Deputy Representative of UNICEF Malawi, gave us some general information about the main subjects of UNICEF: child survival, education, HIV and AIDS, hygiene, child protection and health. After that Angela Travis, Head of Communications, gave us some more detailed information about UNICEF in Malawi. Shocking information… She told us that 67% of the people are below 25 years of age. This makes Malawi one of the youngest countries in the world. But everybody can understand this is not a positive thing. The life expectancy is only 53.5 years in Malawi. For comparison, in the Netherlands it is 81.5.

Another shocking number is the under-five mortality ratio: 71 of 1,000 kids die before they are five years old. For the Netherlands this is 4.

Also the education numbers are interesting. In Malawi there is an average of 75 kids per teacher, and 25% of kids are not making it till standard 8, and drop of before standard 5.

Active kids in class - By Roelanda Hulzebosch

Active kids in class – By Roelanda Hulzebosch

This is the reason UNICEF is in Malawi. And it works! The child survival rate is going up, because there is better nutrition, mothers are encouraged to give birth in a clinic and the young kids get vaccinated. Also education is getting better. In Malawi, there are as many boys as girls in standard 1. This is very special in sub-Sahara countries. Also education is getting better, by training the teachers, better school buildings, and a great initiative; mothers’ groups! In these groups, girls will be guided by mothers in the community to help them with the real girl issues. Also they motivate the girls to go to school.

After all the information we got from the UNICEF staff, we went to a child-friendly school to see it with our own eyes: Mchuchu Primary School in Lilongwe. This is a school with over 900 kids! We first were introduced by Elisabeth, head teacher of this school. After the general information, we were able to join a lesson. Christina, Johan and I were lucky to join a Chichewa class. ;) We couldn’t understand a word, but what we saw was great. Kids with a lot of interest for the subject, all paying attention to the teacher. A teacher with a very open and friendly face was encouraging the kids and giving them confidence to speak. They had only five textbooks, but they gathered around in groups and did their very best and were so motivated to read the pages. Really great to see.

After this, we had to make a long drive to the next town, Blantire. It took us 4.5 hours, but this was no problem, we had the best view ever!

This was our first official visit to a school, and we could see what UNCEF is doing, and that what they are doing works out very well! Hopefully the rest of the days we will see much more of these great examples, so we will see what we all work for, at IKEA and at UNICEF.

About Roelanda Hulzebosch

I work in the kitchen department at IKEA Amersfoort in the Netherlands. Last year I applied to be a social ambassador and am very lucky that I was selected for this role. At IKEA, we are making a huge difference in the world by supporting large organisations. And also in our own neighbourhoods by supporting small, local projects and cooperating with local organisations. That's why I'm proud to work for IKEA.

Dropouts decreases, happy children increases


Can you remember how many classmates you had when you went to primary school? Twenty, maybe 25? A lot of attention from the teacher anyhow. In Malawi, the pupil-to-teacher ratio is 75 students for 1 teacher. Most of the time teaching takes place under a tree or on the floor in a dirty classroom, without windows. Can you imagine how much help is needed over here?

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A full classroom of the Naotcha Primary School – By Anke Hermkens

Today (Tuesday) was our second day of the IWitness programme in Malawi, and we went to the Kalitsiro Community Based Child Care Centre, the Naotcha Primary School and the Amalika Teachers College. I didn’t know what to expect, an African daycare for orphans. What would they do?

When we arrived it was immediately clear to me. They gave the children a safe base. Thanks to UNICEF and the IKEA Foundation, these children have a sort of classroom, a shelter, latrines, a kitchen and a borehole (a well for water). Every day they get a meal, something to play with and a lot of love. Their biggest challenge was to organise a meal every day, they were struggling with it. It was such a heartbreaker, all these lovely children, sometimes without food. In Holland we are so used to providing the basics for ourselves and our family.

When we got the chance to meet the children, they were in the beginning very shy and we had to win their trust. Once we had won their trust, they were the happiest kids in the world. Just being happy because someone is giving them attention. And that’s universal.

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A boy eating his meal at the Kalitsiro Community Based Child Care Centre – by Anke Hermkens

In 2011 UNICEF came to help at the Naotcha Primary School. They constructed five buildings with ten classrooms in total, three teachers’ houses and ten toilets: four for boys, four for girls and two for the staff. They also provide desks in all 24 classrooms and chairs and tables for teachers. Nowadays, 5,376 children can happily go to school without sitting on a cold dirty floor and can go to the toilet (without latrines at schools, the dropout rate increases). The acceptance rate to secondary school is increasing.

These are all amazing facts. And this is all thanks to UNICEF, the staff of the primary school and IKEA. I am so proud, I’m constantly getting shivers.

Because we also wanted to see the quality of education, we went to the Amalika Teachers College. They really are clued in; they see teaching in a holistic way. They’re running the school together because they believe that they can learn more, side by side. When I asked one of the students why he wanted to became a teacher, he told me that he wanted to help his country and the children to lift Malawi up to a higher level. He wanted to become a role model. That is what teaching is about, inspiring your students.

A student of the Amalika Teachers College showing us their vegetablegarden to become a good rolemodel - By

A student of the Amalika Teachers College showing us their vegetablegarden to become a good rolemodel – By Anke Hermkens

 

About Anke Hermkens

I have been an IKEA co-worker in the Cooking and Eating department at IKEA Eindhoven, the Netherlands, since June 2013. I studied Cultural Heritage to became an exhibition maker. I love cultural festivals, music, travelling and cooking. I am proud of working at IKEA, a company that takes responsibility for people and the planet.